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Frequency
Frequency
A police detective in 2016 discovers that she is able to speak via a ham radio with her estranged father; Frank Sullivan, a detective who died in 1996 and the two must work together to change the history of tragic events to come while also getting the chance to heal their complicated relationship

SEASON:1 Episode: 1 




Cast

Details

Release Date:

 28 April 2000

Language

English



Country of Origin

USA




Plot Summary 

A rare atmospheric phenomenon allows a New York City firefighter to communicate with his son 30 years in the future via HAM radio. The son uses this opportunity to warn the father of his impending death in a warehouse fire, and manages to save his life. However, what he does not realize is that changing history has triggered a new set of tragic events, including the murder of his mother. The two men must now work together, 30 years apart, to find the murderer before he strikes so that they can change history--again.
Thirty-six year old homicide detective John Sullivan lives in the same Queens, New York house in which he grew up with his firefighter father Frank Sullivan and nurse mother Julia Sullivan. Frank died on October 12, 1969 (when John was only six) on duty in a warehouse fire. Despite Frank dying when John was so young, John remembers his father well as he has a keepsake book of photos and news clippings about Frank, who was a huge Mets fan. Almost thirty years to the day of Frank's death, John finds Frank's old ham radio, which Frank used to use all the time to speak to people around the world. A discussion about the 1969 World Series with the first person he makes contact with on the radio makes John ultimately come to the realization that he is speaking to his father who is using the exact same ham radio and sitting at the exact same desk in the exact same house exactly thirty years earlier. Although they don't know the reason for being able to contact each other, John tries to use whatever knowledge he has to help his father, especially in averting the cause of his death. But John and Frank learn that knowledge is a powerful tool which can result in both good and bad as John works on a "new" thirty year old on-going case of murdered nurses, the case coined the "Nightingale murders" which has a personal connection to the Sullivan family.
John Sullivan (Caviezel) is a New York City homicide officer who is traumatized for 30 years following the death of his father, Frank (Quaid), After finding Frank's HAM radio, John begins talking to Frank, 30 years into the future. Together, they change the past but have to find a way to stop a serial killer from murdering John's Mom & Frank's wife with a 30 year gap
An accidental cross-time radio link connects father and son across 30 years. The son tries to save his father's life, but then must fix the 


Frequency Season 1 Episode 2 Review: Signal and Noise

Maybe if every cop had a personal stake in their investigations, they'd find a suspect in under 24 hours, too.

As frustrating as it will probably get, Frequency Season 1 Episode 2 makes it very clear that ANY action in the past that's based upon knowledge from the future is going have a butterfly effect, no matter how small.



Things are moving very fast. Frank and Raimi barely know each other. He went undercover when she was six and "died" when she was eight. As adults, they've built up a quick trust over the ham radio because of the bizarre nature of their situation and the sudden death of Raimi's mom in the present

Episode 2
“Signal and Noise,” proved that Frequency showrunner Jeremy Carver (probably best known for his work on Supernatural) and his team of writers have a solid plan in place for Season 1 of the show. While Raimy and Frank’s hunt for the Nightingale Killer will certainly be a part of the series’ DNA moving forward, Frequency is tackling the storyline in a surprising and interesting way. I thought that we would have to wait till at least midseason to learn any hints about the killer’s identity. However, by the end of “Signal and Noise,” Raimy and Frank believe that they have their man; the only issue is that their partnership, and the changes they make to the past, begin to create new roadblocks that they have to overcome, both for Frank in 1996 and for Raimy in 2016.



These new challenges that emerge as a result of Raimy and Frank interacting with each other provide the most compelling plot-centric moments on Frequency. There’s palpable tension when Frank and Satch arrive at Thomas Goff’s house, as we watch him try to hide his kidnapped victim from the detectives, and while the twist that Goff no longer lives at his house in New Jersey anymore (after Raimy urges Frank to look more into the Nightingale Killer) isn’t a major shocker, it’s still a clever way to utilize the show’s time-travel elements. It would seem so easy for either Raimy or Frank to solve this case by sharing the information that they have with each other, but each action that Frank takes in the past directly affects Raimy’s investigation, causing her to have to reevaluate and reassess all the facts she has. It’s the most inventive way that Frequency can tell its serial-killer story, and this unique method has me much more invested in what’s happening with the Nightingale Killer than I expected to be.

What works even better for Frequency than the cop drama material, though, is its emotional moments. The scenes between Raimy and Frank, both in the past with her younger self and in 2016 with her older self, were the highlight of the show’s pilot, and they’re terrific again throughout “Signal and Noise.” My favorite scene of the entire episode is Frank, Julie, and Raimy sitting at the dinner table, discussing how she now wants to wear a Yankees hat after they won the World Series. It’s a simple scene that focuses on the family, but it’s so wonderfully written and authentically acted that it makes the Sullivans feel very real, even though they’re in the middle of a time-travel drama. Even though the dinner scene is a small moment in an episode filled with big mysteries and major reveals, it’s an important one because of how genuine it feels; scenes like this make us care about Raimy and her family, and if we don’t feel a bond with them, then how are we supposed to be interested in everything going on around them?

And this same honest emotion is also found in the sadder scenes of “Signal and Noise,” such as when Julie kicks Frank out of the house, reminding him that he chose his job over his family and never gave her a good enough reason as to why he did it. Julie’s words are harsh, and they hit Frank harder than any bullet. However, they’re also necessary for what comes next, as Frank brings her into the garage to try and get her to talk to Raimy through the radio. Riley Smith does a stellar job at selling Frank’s desperation; he just wants to fix things with his wife, no matter what, and believes this is the only way. Meanwhile, Peyton List is marvelous while portraying Raimy’s painful struggle to not answer as she hears her mother’s voice through the radio; even though nothing would make her happier than to speak to her mom, Raimey also understands that she and her father can’t keep messing with time, because it’s creating more problems than solutions (please take note, The Flash‘s Barry Allen).

I’m not sure if Frequency will be able to balance its different storylines this well in the weeks to come, and there’s even some stories in this episode, such as Frank’s face-off with the corrupt cop, Stan, that fall a little flat compared to everything else. But there’s a lot of great stuff in this show, from the performances to the emotional moments to the way it heightens the basic police procedural with time travel. With Jeremy Carver at the helm and final sequences like the one we got tonight, with Raimy racing to discover the underground bunker in Goff’s backyard, I have faith that Frequency can maintain the quality it’s had in these first two episodes and am excited to see where the show goes next

FREQUENCY (TV SERIES)

Frequency
Frequency
A police detective in 2016 discovers that she is able to speak via a ham radio with her estranged father; Frank Sullivan, a detective who died in 1996 and the two must work together to change the history of tragic events to come while also getting the chance to heal their complicated relationship

SEASON:1 Episode: 1 




Cast

Details

Release Date:

 28 April 2000

Language

English



Country of Origin

USA




Plot Summary 

A rare atmospheric phenomenon allows a New York City firefighter to communicate with his son 30 years in the future via HAM radio. The son uses this opportunity to warn the father of his impending death in a warehouse fire, and manages to save his life. However, what he does not realize is that changing history has triggered a new set of tragic events, including the murder of his mother. The two men must now work together, 30 years apart, to find the murderer before he strikes so that they can change history--again.
Thirty-six year old homicide detective John Sullivan lives in the same Queens, New York house in which he grew up with his firefighter father Frank Sullivan and nurse mother Julia Sullivan. Frank died on October 12, 1969 (when John was only six) on duty in a warehouse fire. Despite Frank dying when John was so young, John remembers his father well as he has a keepsake book of photos and news clippings about Frank, who was a huge Mets fan. Almost thirty years to the day of Frank's death, John finds Frank's old ham radio, which Frank used to use all the time to speak to people around the world. A discussion about the 1969 World Series with the first person he makes contact with on the radio makes John ultimately come to the realization that he is speaking to his father who is using the exact same ham radio and sitting at the exact same desk in the exact same house exactly thirty years earlier. Although they don't know the reason for being able to contact each other, John tries to use whatever knowledge he has to help his father, especially in averting the cause of his death. But John and Frank learn that knowledge is a powerful tool which can result in both good and bad as John works on a "new" thirty year old on-going case of murdered nurses, the case coined the "Nightingale murders" which has a personal connection to the Sullivan family.
John Sullivan (Caviezel) is a New York City homicide officer who is traumatized for 30 years following the death of his father, Frank (Quaid), After finding Frank's HAM radio, John begins talking to Frank, 30 years into the future. Together, they change the past but have to find a way to stop a serial killer from murdering John's Mom & Frank's wife with a 30 year gap
An accidental cross-time radio link connects father and son across 30 years. The son tries to save his father's life, but then must fix the 


Frequency Season 1 Episode 2 Review: Signal and Noise

Maybe if every cop had a personal stake in their investigations, they'd find a suspect in under 24 hours, too.

As frustrating as it will probably get, Frequency Season 1 Episode 2 makes it very clear that ANY action in the past that's based upon knowledge from the future is going have a butterfly effect, no matter how small.



Things are moving very fast. Frank and Raimi barely know each other. He went undercover when she was six and "died" when she was eight. As adults, they've built up a quick trust over the ham radio because of the bizarre nature of their situation and the sudden death of Raimi's mom in the present

Episode 2
“Signal and Noise,” proved that Frequency showrunner Jeremy Carver (probably best known for his work on Supernatural) and his team of writers have a solid plan in place for Season 1 of the show. While Raimy and Frank’s hunt for the Nightingale Killer will certainly be a part of the series’ DNA moving forward, Frequency is tackling the storyline in a surprising and interesting way. I thought that we would have to wait till at least midseason to learn any hints about the killer’s identity. However, by the end of “Signal and Noise,” Raimy and Frank believe that they have their man; the only issue is that their partnership, and the changes they make to the past, begin to create new roadblocks that they have to overcome, both for Frank in 1996 and for Raimy in 2016.



These new challenges that emerge as a result of Raimy and Frank interacting with each other provide the most compelling plot-centric moments on Frequency. There’s palpable tension when Frank and Satch arrive at Thomas Goff’s house, as we watch him try to hide his kidnapped victim from the detectives, and while the twist that Goff no longer lives at his house in New Jersey anymore (after Raimy urges Frank to look more into the Nightingale Killer) isn’t a major shocker, it’s still a clever way to utilize the show’s time-travel elements. It would seem so easy for either Raimy or Frank to solve this case by sharing the information that they have with each other, but each action that Frank takes in the past directly affects Raimy’s investigation, causing her to have to reevaluate and reassess all the facts she has. It’s the most inventive way that Frequency can tell its serial-killer story, and this unique method has me much more invested in what’s happening with the Nightingale Killer than I expected to be.

What works even better for Frequency than the cop drama material, though, is its emotional moments. The scenes between Raimy and Frank, both in the past with her younger self and in 2016 with her older self, were the highlight of the show’s pilot, and they’re terrific again throughout “Signal and Noise.” My favorite scene of the entire episode is Frank, Julie, and Raimy sitting at the dinner table, discussing how she now wants to wear a Yankees hat after they won the World Series. It’s a simple scene that focuses on the family, but it’s so wonderfully written and authentically acted that it makes the Sullivans feel very real, even though they’re in the middle of a time-travel drama. Even though the dinner scene is a small moment in an episode filled with big mysteries and major reveals, it’s an important one because of how genuine it feels; scenes like this make us care about Raimy and her family, and if we don’t feel a bond with them, then how are we supposed to be interested in everything going on around them?

And this same honest emotion is also found in the sadder scenes of “Signal and Noise,” such as when Julie kicks Frank out of the house, reminding him that he chose his job over his family and never gave her a good enough reason as to why he did it. Julie’s words are harsh, and they hit Frank harder than any bullet. However, they’re also necessary for what comes next, as Frank brings her into the garage to try and get her to talk to Raimy through the radio. Riley Smith does a stellar job at selling Frank’s desperation; he just wants to fix things with his wife, no matter what, and believes this is the only way. Meanwhile, Peyton List is marvelous while portraying Raimy’s painful struggle to not answer as she hears her mother’s voice through the radio; even though nothing would make her happier than to speak to her mom, Raimey also understands that she and her father can’t keep messing with time, because it’s creating more problems than solutions (please take note, The Flash‘s Barry Allen).

I’m not sure if Frequency will be able to balance its different storylines this well in the weeks to come, and there’s even some stories in this episode, such as Frank’s face-off with the corrupt cop, Stan, that fall a little flat compared to everything else. But there’s a lot of great stuff in this show, from the performances to the emotional moments to the way it heightens the basic police procedural with time travel. With Jeremy Carver at the helm and final sequences like the one we got tonight, with Raimy racing to discover the underground bunker in Goff’s backyard, I have faith that Frequency can maintain the quality it’s had in these first two episodes and am excited to see where the show goes next

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